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srt6
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Just to throw another option out there.  Some of the stability you pick up by going to dually is due to less tire flex.  You could consider upgrading to the 19.5 inch tires and wheels.  When I was using truck and camper set ups, the only time I went to dually was for when weight capacity dictated it.  I always preferred how the single rear wheel truck drove on rutted roads, etc.  

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Just to throw another option out there.  Some of the stability you pick up by going to dually is due to less tire flex.  You could consider upgrading to the 19.5 inch tires and wheels.  When I was using truck and camper set ups, the only time I went to dually was for when weight capacity dictated it.  I always preferred how the single rear wheel truck drove on rutted roads, etc.  
Yeah well see if I'll need to do that. I am currently running 20x9 and 33s so it's not terrible. My wife isnt pleased with the ride and were planning to add a boat to the mix.
Next time out I need to play more with the air bags. I put them at 80 last trip. Might help if I lower it to like 30 to 60... trial and error

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17 hours ago, srt6 said:

Yeah well see if I'll need to do that. I am currently running 20x9 and 33s so it's not terrible. My wife isnt pleased with the ride and were planning to add a boat to the mix.
Next time out I need to play more with the air bags. I put them at 80 last trip. Might help if I lower it to like 30 to 60... trial and error

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Too much air in the bags can be a bad thing. I am not familiar enough with the suspension on your GM rig so I can't say what exactly I would do. But I will say that if there is no load on your springs, then you need to get them in contact.  I know a lot of folks have used the TorkLift Stable Loads to help get rid of the sway.  Perhaps check them out? 

 

Doug

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Too much air in the bags can be a bad thing. I am not familiar enough with the suspension on your GM rig so I can't say what exactly I would do. But I will say that if there is no load on your springs, then you need to get them in contact.  I know a lot of folks have used the TorkLift Stable Loads to help get rid of the sway.  Perhaps check them out? 
 
Doug
I have a 2017 ram 3500 srw.

I saw the stable loads it kinda freaks me out what seems to be kinking the leaf? Usually they use the entire surface area against eachother.

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I was looking at the PacBrake system for my bags. I see there is a similar one by AirLift. Either way, I would add a small air tank.

 

https://www.airliftcompany.com/products/compressor-systems/wirelessair/

 

Dave

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On 2/1/2020 at 10:53 AM, srt6 said:

I have a 2017 ram 3500 srw.

I saw the stable loads it kinda freaks me out what seems to be kinking the leaf? Usually they use the entire surface area against eachother.

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With the 2017 Ram 3500 I would start with a set of extended bumpstops.  I found that by having all four corners of the overload springs engaged the sway was greatly reduced.  Add just enough air to the bags to raise it a bit but still keep the overloads engaged.  I found with my Lance camper that due to the weight difference from side to side it was best to inflate one side, measure the distance from the top of the tire to the wheel well then add air to the other side to get the same distance.  One side always took several more pounds of pressure to get things even.  But once done, it rode very well.  

 

Doug

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21 hours ago, Fuzzy Bear said:

With the 2017 Ram 3500 I would start with a set of extended bumpstops.  I found that by having all four corners of the overload springs engaged the sway was greatly reduced.  Add just enough air to the bags to raise it a bit but still keep the overloads engaged.  I found with my Lance camper that due to the weight difference from side to side it was best to inflate one side, measure the distance from the top of the tire to the wheel well then add air to the other side to get the same distance.  One side always took several more pounds of pressure to get things even.  But once done, it rode very well.  

 

Doug

 

Aren't the extended bump stops pretty easy to swap out? Just in case you want to soften the ride back up? I think that's the appeal of the lower spring stable loads. Only engaged when needed. 

 

Dave

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On 2/1/2020 at 7:53 AM, srt6 said:

I have a 2017 ram 3500 srw.

I saw the stable loads it kinda freaks me out what seems to be kinking the leaf? Usually they use the entire surface area against eachother.

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I don'tknow that is a specific problem. I can remember many years ago when we had bolt on overloads on a Toyota truck that we hauled wood in. But, it used similar point loads to bolster the spring pack. But once it was bolted up, it stayed on until you took it off. The stable loads actually have a pretty good bearing area in contrast to that old system we used. 

 

Dave

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I don'tknow that is a specific problem. I can remember many years ago when we had bolt on overloads on a Toyota truck that we hauled wood in. But, it used similar point loads to bolster the spring pack. But once it was bolted up, it stayed on until you took it off. The stable loads actually have a pretty good bearing area in contrast to that old system we used. 
 
Dave
My truck did not come with factory overloads. I know I tried to get them but I was told they only came on dually.

I think my next adjustment would be to add supplemental overloads. I'll try messing with bag pressure for the time being.



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1 hour ago, Fishin2Deep4U said:

 

Aren't the extended bump stops pretty easy to swap out? Just in case you want to soften the ride back up? I think that's the appeal of the lower spring stable loads. Only engaged when needed. 

 

Dave

Very easy 15 minutes.  There is a nut on the top, just unbolt and remove.  I haven't looked at the StableLoads so not sure how they are set up.  But I have used a lot of their other products and have been quite pleased.  It's a local company for you folks up there.  Stop and chat with them if you can.

 

Doug

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7 minutes ago, Fuzzy Bear said:

Very easy 15 minutes.  There is a nut on the top, just unbolt and remove.  I haven't looked at the StableLoads so not sure how they are set up.  But I have used a lot of their other products and have been quite pleased.  It's a local company for you folks up there.  Stop and chat with them if you can.

 

Doug

 

Stableloads basically clamp to the lower overload leaf. You can rotate a wedge to engage the spring pack. basically, fills the space between the overload and the pack.  This is then simply held in place with a drop in pin. Same thing with it rotated out of the way. 

 

It's an interesting concept, but I have no first hand experience with it. 

I'm still researching extended stingers and load capacity. Need to be able to haul the boat with the camper on board. 

 

Dave

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Stableloads basically clamp to the lower overload leaf. You can rotate a wedge to engage the spring pack. basically, fills the space between the overload and the pack.  This is then simply held in place with a drop in pin. Same thing with it rotated out of the way. 
 
It's an interesting concept, but I have no first hand experience with it. 

I'm still researching extended stingers and load capacity. Need to be able to haul the boat with the camper on board. 
 
Dave
Yeah that's what I was seeing for stable loads, seemed really simple but i have zero first hand experience or know anyone with any.

My camper leaves me roughly 1500 ish lbs to stay legal. I have a 38in super hitch truss havent towed with it yet. I plan to in may that's when I'll findout how it does with our boat.

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2 hours ago, srt6 said:

Yeah that's what I was seeing for stable loads, seemed really simple but i have zero first hand experience or know anyone with any.

My camper leaves me roughly 1500 ish lbs to stay legal. I have a 38in super hitch truss havent towed with it yet. I plan to in may that's when I'll findout how it does with our boat.

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I was looking at the specs for the Supertruss. I can't data on anything outside of the 48" length. And that will require weight distribution for me. I wonder if they have published values for shorter lengths anywhere. 

 

You will have 1500lbs of capacity remaining? Did you get a lighter camper? 

 

Dave

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I was looking at the specs for the Supertruss. I can't data on anything outside of the 48" length. And that will require weight distribution for me. I wonder if they have published values for shorter lengths anywhere. 
 
You will have 1500lbs of capacity remaining? Did you get a lighter camper? 
 
Dave
The info I can find is all over on my truck ranging from 4500 to 5500 lbs payload.

I dont travel with my camper wet or with really much stuff so it "should be" 3000 ish pounds.

Next time I load it I'm planning to hit the scales to know for sure.

The wheels and tires we have are rated at 3750 a corner. So I'm really not shy of 19.5 last I looked were 4k a corner.

To be clear. I understand the camper will move ect, my wife is convinced a dually will fix everything. So far I've convinced her to hold off for a couple years but well see how that shakes out.

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49 minutes ago, srt6 said:

The info I can find is all over on my truck ranging from 4500 to 5500 lbs payload.

I dont travel with my camper wet or with really much stuff so it "should be" 3000 ish pounds.

Next time I load it I'm planning to hit the scales to know for sure.

The wheels and tires we have are rated at 3750 a corner. So I'm really not shy of 19.5 last I looked were 4k a corner.

To be clear. I understand the camper will move ect, my wife is convinced a dually will fix everything. So far I've convinced her to hold off for a couple years but well see how that shakes out.

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Not sure what configuration your truck is. But mine has an advertised payload of 4320lbs. However, when you look at GVWR it's 12,300. This is for Crew Cab, 8' box, 4x4, Aisin.

 

But, with a full load of fuel my truck weighted in at 8740 lbs at the local CAT scales with me and a passenger in it. That really only leaves 3560 lbs of true payload capacity if I want to stay within the sticker. A dually would obviously have greater payload capacity than the SRW. It could be up to 14000 GVWR depending on options. 

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1dsr5yqmGzeMVPn455VHQczi9BrgHtnQU

 

 

Dave

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A good article on wet weights. Remember, Arctic Fox does not include the standard "required" options in the dry weight. 

 

"When we took the 2015 Arctic Fox 990 to the CAT Scale, the well-optioned camper weighed 5,185 pounds, fully wet and loaded with our stuff.  With late model single-rear-wheel one-ton trucks maxing out in the low to mid 4,000 range, the Arctic Fox 990 requires a late model one-ton to be within payload capacity"

 

https://www.truckcampermagazine.com/camper-reviews/colorado-crazy-with-a-fox/

 

Dave

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What I have found is you are ALWAYS heaver than you think.

 Everything you pack adds weight, clothes, Cooking gear, food, drinks, chairs, bikes, people. It all adds up.

 Our Eahle Cap 1200 actual dry weight when it left the factory was 5,300lbs.

 Total combined set up for a couple of weeks on the road  is 16,500lbs.

 I have my own design UPPER stableloads (blocks controled by pneumatic cyls that move under the spring pads when in use) and air bags. 

 I do not have lower stable loads and dont think I will ever need them

 The goal is the have ALL the different springs working together for the best ride and control.

 When it comes to camper the higher COG is helped by a wider footprint, duallys will do better than SRW.

 I will second that too much air in the air bags will.make the truck feel top heavy.

 I know a lot of people that have taken their truck and camper to automotive spring places and had custom spring packs made up.

 

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What o have found is you are ALWAYS heaver than you think.
 Everything you pac adds weight, clothes, Cooking gear, food, drinks, chairs, bikes, people. It all adds up.
 Our Eahle Cap 1200 actual dry weight when it left the factory was 5,300lbs.
 Total combined set up for a couple of weeks on the road  is 16,500lbs.
 I have my own design UPPER stableloads (blocks controled by pneumatic cyls that move under the spring pads when in use) and air bags. 
 I do not have lower stable loads and dont think I will ever need them
 The goal is the have ALL the different springs working g together for the best ride and control.
 When it comes to camper the higher COG is helped by a wider footprint, duallys will do better than SRW.
 I will second that too much air in the air bags will.make the truck feel top heavy.
 I know a lot of people that have taken their truck and camper to automotive spring places and had custom spring packs made up.
 
Is there a local reputable place. The only company that comes to mind I deaver springs in California.

That's something I can look into I'm betting i could get similar to factory overloads too. That's a great idea



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16 hours ago, srt6 said:

Is there a local reputable place. The only company that comes to mind I deaver springs in California.

That's something I can look into I'm betting i could get similar to factory overloads too. That's a great idea



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I would say that if you have the time and opportunity, visit TLCentral (TorkLift) in Kent.  They are pretty straightforward and know their stuff.  I was happy they were local when I needed both my 2003 and 2008 set up for hauling my campers.  They aren't cheap, but  they do stand behind their products. They will always make it right.

 

Doug

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  • 1 month later...

Okay update, we picked up lower overload stable loads at the rv show in feb. Just loaded up the camper for the first time after installing.
Definitely made a difference started the bags at 15 seems like 35 is the happy place.

Thanks guys for mentioning these!!!

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I installed the Airlift bags and compresser system with wireless remote as soon as I got my new truck in Feb 2019.

been hauling a travel,trailer and heavy utility with gravel(5000 lbs) .Works flawlessly.

The bags were great hauling the Caddy CTS on a flatdeck(total trailer with car was 6150 lbs) from northern Alberta last month on 

crappy roads with more potholes than smooth surfaces.

The ability to balance side to side is a good thing for me some times.

We tried a camper a few years back but went back to a travel trailer after my wife found she couldn’t get far enough away from my snoring in an 8 foot camper!🧐🤨

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  • 5 months later...

Well traded the srw for drw a couple weeks ago.
Finally got it setup and the camper on it.
I knew there would be a difference, but holy crap is it more stable!!!
First trip will be this weekend headed down i5 should be a good test though oregon. 511e7bef4ee72b4c886080fb03301756.jpg

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I had a real pretty 1996 dually and pulled a 35 foot trailer that was heavy.  Really didn't seem too bad with the dually.  I realized the trailer was overkill for me to take hunting, so I put the trailer on the lot and bought a 3/4 ton.  When the trailer sold the guy told me he needed to put a hitch on his truck to be able to tow it and asked me if I would deliver it.  I said sure no problem, it was only going about 15 miles.  I hooked it up to my 3/4 ton truck and proceeded to deliver it....  The difference between the two trucks was huge.  I was going as slow as possible and the trailer was still throwing the truck around.  If I had to go any further I wouldn't have done it.  I really miss the dually when pulling a heavy trailer, but I can go thru the drive thru at the bank and mcdonalds with the 3/4 ton so I was happier with it....  Don't have a cummins anymore, daily driver is a Fiat 500!!

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8 hours ago, srt6 said:

Well traded the srw for drw a couple weeks ago.
Finally got it setup and the camper on it.
I knew there would be a difference, but holy crap is it more stable!!!
First trip will be this weekend headed down i5 should be a good test though oregon. 511e7bef4ee72b4c886080fb03301756.jpg

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Nice looking setup!!!!!!!!!!

Enjoy!

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