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Oil change intervals what say you?

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I was just wondering how many miles people go between oil changes specially on the newer trucks.

Dodge says go 15,000 between changes in my 2014 and I can't wrap my head around that. I am using delo 400 not Amsoil or any other full synthetic.

I couldn't bring myself to go past 5000 miles before the second oil change. I did a complete fluid change on the entire truck right after I got it home.

I plan on doing 5000 mile oil changes just for peace of mind.

What are the rest of you doing?

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I’m at 9,500 on this change and it says I have 40% to go.  I plan to change it real soon.  I didn’t intend to go this long but I’ve been really busy at home and work. 

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10k on my pig and she’s had three changed. 

 

I intend to run amsoil from here out at 10k mile intervals. 

 

Its not the base oil that scares me, but the soot content with these egr trucks. 

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I change mine once a year generally around 7k if that. I’m curious on my 10 is the service reminder set by mileage or is there a sensor that tells it when it needs changed? Mine is also missing some pieces 😉😉😉

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53 minutes ago, marksmith said:

10k on my pig and she’s had three changed. 

 

I intend to run amsoil from here out at 10k mile intervals. 

 

Its not the base oil that scares me, but the soot content with these egr trucks. 

I dropped the first oil at 2,500.  Second change was 10,000.  Now at 19,500.   Probably change it this weekend socme my 04.5 needs one too

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Not a newer truck but I have always change the oil in my truck (for the 120,000 miles) at 6000 miles. Like Mark said, I have never been concerned about lubrication or corrosion issues due to low base numbers. The biggest issue is the oils ability to suspend solids. This goes for synthetic oils and dino oil. Once you lose the ability to suspend solids you start getting sludge build up.

 

When I change my oil it is black, and I mean there is no hint of brown to the oil. If you are changing your oil and it still has a brown color to it, you can probably run it longer. If you put a couple drops on a paper towel and when it soaks through you have sludge left behind, you waited too long.

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annual changes , before heading south for the winter , truck sits most of the time so milage isn't the issue to me.

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If soot buildup is a concern prior to oil breakdown, maybe add one of those super duper bypass filters. 
Or even better, send in an oil sample that way you know exactly what your oil condition is at a certain amount of miles. We run almost every engine in our fleet to 500HRS and some have gone past 500HRS and the samples come back good unless there is another issue with the engine.

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk

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36 minutes ago, Woodenhead said:

If soot buildup is a concern prior to oil breakdown, maybe add one of those super duper bypass filters. 

 

I have a bypass set up  , oil [synthetic here] still looks bad in a few miles so looks isn't a determining factor .. sample is 

 

I quit doing samples after a few years as I never had any fluctuation worth the expense [my changes back then were at 50K as I felt guilty.. but samples said good to go still but changed at 50K  ] 

 

my change interval is one year now , but we all know that way less then 10K is still good to go ... I probably put on less than 5K a year now .

Edited by GTroyer

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If you are really concerned about sludge build up, then you should install a centrifugal filter. I looked at doing this years ago but lost interest quickly when i saw the cost to do so. Most bypass filters are not that effective in removing suspended solids under about 30 microns. If they are, they don't have sufficient flow to keep up with the amount of particulate being produced. Also I am not a big fan of sampling for particulate count. It will give you base number and metal/contaminate break down. To get accurate particulate reading you need to sample from the engine while it's running and directly after the filter, when the engine is at operating temperature. Most people don't sample this way...

 

We have played with sampling extensively on the bigger engine as we have a spectra-graphic analyzer here at the plant. How you sample and where you sample makes a huge difference. For that reason i don't have a lot of faith in the reports.... 

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If you are really concerned about sludge build up, then you should install a centrifugal filter. I looked at doing this years ago but lost interest quickly when i saw the cost to do so. Most bypass filters are not that effective in removing suspended solids under about 30 microns. If they are, they don't have sufficient flow to keep up with the amount of particulate being produced. Also I am not a big fan of sampling for particulate count. It will give you base number and metal/contaminate break down. To get accurate particulate reading you need to sample from the engine while it's running and directly after the filter, when the engine is at operating temperature. Most people don't sample this way...
 
We have played with sampling extensively on the bigger engine as we have a spectra-graphic analyzer here at the plant. How you sample and where you sample makes a huge difference. For that reason i don't have a lot of faith in the reports.... 
We run those and they are not worth the trouble IMHO.

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk

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1 hour ago, Austin The DieselTech said:

We run those and they are not worth the trouble IMHO.

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
 

 

I agree.... to a point. It all depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you want to run your oil much longer to save cost then they make sense. This applies when you have to change 35,000 gallons to change your oil. If you are only changing 3 gallons, they make no sense....

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1 hour ago, Torque Monkey said:

If you are really concerned about sludge build up, then you should install a centrifugal filter. I looked at doing this years ago but lost interest quickly when i saw the cost to do so. Most bypass filters are not that effective in removing suspended solids under about 30 microns. If they are, they don't have sufficient flow to keep up with the amount of particulate being produced. Also I am not a big fan of sampling for particulate count. It will give you base number and metal/contaminate break down. To get accurate particulate reading you need to sample from the engine while it's running and directly after the filter, when the engine is at operating temperature. Most people don't sample this way...

 

We have played with sampling extensively on the bigger engine as we have a spectra-graphic analyzer here at the plant. How you sample and where you sample makes a huge difference. For that reason i don't have a lot of faith in the reports.... 

 

Thats some solid info. 

 

I worked in a stationary power plant when I was in school. Part of my Monday morning routine was to clean the centrifugal filter 👎

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I agree.... to a point. It all depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you want to run your oil much longer to save cost then they make sense. This applies when you have to change 35,000 gallons to change your oil. If you are only changing 3 gallons, they make no sense....

Exactly and most of our systems that have those only have around a 6 gallon capacity.

 

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

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I think I will just stick to my 5,000 mile intervals. That's what I do in the Jetta as well even with full synthetic. With over 200,000 it just seems like cheap insurance to me. At least it works in my head.

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1 hour ago, HOSS said:

I think I will just stick to my 5,000 mile intervals. That's what I do in the Jetta as well even with full synthetic. With over 200,000 it just seems like cheap insurance to me. At least it works in my head.

 

In the big picture i think that is all that is important. LOL!

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Honestly, Delo at 10k intervals. I ran oil reports twice a year.

But, if your an in town driver I would go 7.5k and get it checked, if ok go to 10k and call it good.

This is with over 800k miles worth of driving my 2 Dodges.

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stating the obvious here ..

 

drive habits make a huge difference ... if one is using in the commute world or stop n go traffic then the shorter intervals are a must but when the majority of the miles are long drives where the engine are fully heated up and have a chance to burn off the junk then longer intervals are just fine .. but the owner needs to be honest with himself/'herself  if combo driving then believe shorter intervals are required. In my days of driving to work I averaged 70+ miles one way [140-150 a day] drives for many years so the 50K intervals I did were not like a 10K city commute of stop n go crapola .

 

where the heck did that line come from 

Edited by GTroyer

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11 hours ago, GTroyer said:

stating the obvious here ..

 

drive habits make a huge difference ... if one is using in the commute world or stop n go traffic then the shorter intervals are a must but when the majority of the miles are long drives where the engine are fully heated up and have a chance to burn off the junk then longer intervals are just fine .. but the owner needs to be honest with himself/'herself  if combo driving then believe shorter intervals are required. In my days of driving to work I averaged 70+ miles one way [140-150 a day] drives for many years so the 50K intervals I did were not like a 10K city commute of stop n go crapola .

 

where the heck did that line come from 

Looks like you hit the strike through button (or more likely accidentally hit CTRL S) while replying.

Edited by carl20320

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On my phone now .. 

 

no no idea where /what that is Carl ..

 

I’m a one finger operator like many of us “old farts” .. these things are a mistory  to us lol

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