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Rear diff covers put to the test!

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2 hours ago, Austin The DieselTech said:

Still running factory intake on my 6.7. Kinda like the grid heater delete.

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Same here, do you still have the throttle valve?

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2 hours ago, Austin The DieselTech said:

Yup I see no reason to remove it. It is unplugged and in the open position.

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I thought about removing mine just because the pipe is cheap on eBay so far just unplugged seems to work well. 

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I still have mine also. I'm not sure what's up with mine but pulling I can hit 1350 degrees on the steeper stuff fairly quick. I have to really watch it sometimes. My BIL has h&s tuning and can't get it over 1250 with a heavier trailer on the same hills. Tires, gearing, are the same. Tunes are both +60hp. Only difference is he's a mega cab, with xrt pro, throttle valve is gone, and cts2 for gauges.

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Latest part of this test. It looks like part 3, the final part with all the data is yet to come. This is  another pretty good video though I think.

 

 

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 I bought the aam aluminium cover before I ordered my truck. I also would of liked banks to have the comparison with it. The sales pitch is going to be a good one and the product probably similar to the factory aam aluminium one. here is a picture of the inside of the cover. I borrowed the picture off the internet.

 

Casey

20140621_093706_zpse27d06e9.webp

inside aam aluminium diff.jpg

Edited by kcv67
not my picture

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 I bought the aam aluminium cover before I ordered my truck. I also would of liked banks to have the comparison with it. The sales pitch is going to be a good one and the product probably similar to the factory aam aluminium one. here is a picture of the inside of the cover. I borrowed the picture off the internet.
 
Casey
20140621_093706_zpse27d06e9.webp
1119486393_insideaamaluminiumdiff.thumb.jpg.91066af77202a312f423d5870f492363.jpg
Where did you source yours?

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I bought it off Amazon form Quirkparts 10/31/2016 for 97.95 I checked Amazon today and same seller has it for 394.99 . So you might want to try shopping around.

Mopar 6814 9259AC

 

Casey

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The latest rear diff video has more neat info. At this point I wish he would just hurry up already and quit beating around the bush! There is good info in this video as they did a clear cover with the MagTech design. I would agree with a lot of his points about aeration etc but until I see the final numbers from part 3, I disagree with two things. He says that because the fluid is being aerated and turbulent in the cover area that it is NOT getting to the pinion area. From a scientific standpoint he can't say that. He can say that he "thinks" fluid is not getting there but without actually seeing or measuring the pinion area he cannot say conclusively. And despite the turbulent fluid at the rear, I still think fluid IS getting up front as well, although I would agree that it is most likely aerated fluid. And point two, he can't say it heating the fluid up just because the fluid is having more work done to it unless he actually measures fluid temps. Which he says is all part of the yet to be seen Part 3. Hurry up with the dang numbers already. :lol:  

 

BUT, so far I would agree that the best design cover in my opinion seems like the AAM aluminum one kcv67 posted above.

 

 

 

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I'm trying to remain as open minded as I possibly can, since every time I watch more of his videos I see his sales pitch coming for his own product. This is not an unbias test.

 

Some of the points he made are valid...  Some of the points he made are inaccurate IMHO and self serving to his agenda.

 

Just with the amount that the fill level dropped proves that the oil is getting to the pinion bearing. Certainly there is a lot more contact with the back cover than with the factory shaped cover. If that is your heat sink, then more fluid coming in contact isn't really a bad thing. It will be interesting to see how the Mag-Hytec does on the dyno. It was really interesting to me to see what is actually going on inside the diff at speed.

 

I can tell you that video has not persuaded me to take my Hytecs off and throw them in the trash yet.

 

 

The other thing I think that is really funny is him stating that the designers of the axle know more about how to make it survive than any aftermarket company. Can some one please remind me how Banks made his money. LOL! There is a lot more that goes in to production of a component like this than surviving abuse. Production cost would be the first thing that would come to mind.

 

If he is to be believed then just keep your factory cover and all of this is a waste of time. LMAO!

 

Can't wait for the dyno video, but I question his results already.

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X 2 Ben , I too am waiting for the "pitch"

 

I do find the video's interesting , but have a big can of skepticism opened up right next to me when watching and waiting 

 

THANKS Shawn for keeping the post going

Edited by GTroyer

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I work on a LOT of gearboxes that need the lubricant carried up the the gears and bearings that are above the lubricant level. Thay all work without a close fitting cover next to the gears. 

 Another thing that is left out is by his logic all 4X4 trucks would loose the front axle bearings because the the ring gear is rotating the wrong direction.

 If he is correct there should be a LOT of bearing and gear failures on all the rigs that had an aftermarket cover. There are a lot of covers in use. Has anyone heard of numerous failures AFTER an aftermarket cover was installed?

 I also totally disagree with his theory that the oil will have to make two 90 degree turns to get to the top. The oil between the cover and the ring gear will be a buffer. Most of the lube will cling to the ring gear and follow  it around to the top And back down.

 Think about when you make a cake and use a mixer. If the mixer blades are in the batter, nothing gets thrown off the blades, take the blades out of the batter and you have a mess.

 I wont say that the aftermarket covers are as good as advertised,  but I really dont think that are causing any damage or using up extra HP. (Unless you run a thicker lube)

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From a marketing standpoint, He is painting his picture very well. I see all sorts of tell tale signs of selective information in his videos. Am I imagining this????

 

If you notice, he picks up the ATS cover to show the inside. It has a bunch of casting features inside. Arguably the best cover to illustrate his point. Also you will notice that when machining the face off the Mag-Hytec they took the channel out of the cover that the ring gear fit into that helped to prevent the exact thing that he is talking about.... Like i said, this is not an unbias test.

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nope Ben

 

agree Bob

Edited by GTroyer

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Another good illustration is the old Power counter top gear train in plastic that had the hand crank. one side had a small amount of regular (light wt) oil and another with "powerpunch" (heavy wt) oil. as you rotated the hand crank the heavy oil clung to the gears better and more oil was carried to the top gear. There was no close fitting cover or baffle to help, the lube just stuck to the gears. 

 I just saw one of these displays the other day, only it was Lucas oil now.

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Another good illustration is the old Power counter top gear train in plastic that had the hand crank. one side had a small amount of regular (light wt) oil and another with "powerpunch" (heavy wt) oil. as you rotated the hand crank the heavy oil clung to the gears better and more oil was carried to the top gear. There was no close fitting cover or baffle to help, the lube just stuck to the gears. 
 I just saw one of these displays the other day, only it was Lucas oil now.
I am guilty of playing with everyone of those I see..........

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6 minutes ago, Austin The DieselTech said:

I am guilty of playing with everyone of those I see..........

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
 

You had to see how fast you can turn it, didn't you?

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I just watched part 3 and he is making a mountain out of a mole hill. I had more mile on my 97 with the mag Hy tec cover and never had a failure. He's trying to dramatize what people are seeing to maybe make them think that his product....and there will be one is better than the rest. He's also not addressing the fact that oil is still on the ring gear and being forced out of the pinion towards the pinion bearings. Nothing but hype.

 

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1 hour ago, livingez_123 said:

I just watched part 3 and he is making a mountain out of a mole hill. I had more mile on my 97 with the mag Hy tec cover and never had a failure. He's trying to dramatize what people are seeing to maybe make them think that his product....and there will be one is better than the rest. He's also not addressing the fact that oil is still on the ring gear and being forced out of the pinion towards the pinion bearings. Nothing but hype.

 

Like I posted earlier, His theory goes to crap when you think what direction the FRONT axle ring gear is rotating.

 It really sounded good in part one. Then he started making assumptions about fluid flow that where totally inaccurate.

 I still believe that shape of the stock cover, for the most part with some exceptions, is because it uses the least material and cheapest way  to make 

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