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NWDave

Owning a chainsaw does not make you a logger

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I may or may not have seen myself in a couple of those!

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Bunch of dumb azzez
Hey!!!! I resemble that remark!
A few of those are professional loggers doing everything right and still having things go sideways.
Some of the others well.....ya can't polish a turd. 🤣

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A couple of those crushed cars were intentional.

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With exception of the poor that was cutting the rotten core tree..... these were all operator error.

 

The guy that had the tree blow apart at the stump on him.... is just lucky.  Its a fallers worse nightmare.

 

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1 minute ago, HOSS said:

A couple of those crushed cars were intentional.

The GEO METRO for sure..

 

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Using a chainsaw while standing on an extension ladder leaning against the tree - FAIL!

Tying yourself off to the section of tree you are removing - FAIL!

 

I was topping a big Hackberry tree in Houston once and was about 40 feet up.  Was harnessed onto the tree.  Had the cut slide back in my direction and slid between me and the tree inside my ropes.  That got real uncomfortable real fast.  Still not sure how I got out of that one with only a few bruises.  Had to buy a new chainsaw though as the tree snapped the rope I had the saw tied so it hit the ground after bouncing off several limbs on the way down.

 

Agree with Mark, almost everyone of those was operator error.

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With exception of the poor that was cutting the rotten core tree..... these were all operator error.
 
The guy that had the tree blow apart at the stump on him.... is just lucky.  Its a fallers worse nightmare.
 
The guy that had that tree split from each side had somebody watching over him! That was a Widowmaker for sure. Nothing he really could have done about that. It was one of the ones I was thinking of and the rotten core.
When we fell the big hemlock right next to my house I knew as old as that tree was it was most likely rotten inside, they just don't live that long. We were very careful and luckily it only had about a 6 in diameter soft spot on the middle. Kept watching for the chips to turn dark and it never happened.
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Just because you can does not mean you should. Even the pros, doing everything right, can have problems. BTDT

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Oaks are famous for rotten centers , if it’s a big old one more than likely rotten out, one has to be extreamly cautious ( even more than normal) 

some of the old live oaks get 4-6’ or more diameter and are shells of 4-6 inch good wood ,  rest rot  .. real scary 

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I won't drop a tree next to a building, I'll let someone who's covered by insurance do it. Anything else I have no problem with. I dropped an old oak not far from Byron's house, that thing spun 270* on the stump and ended up on the RR tracks. Then we were scrambling to get it all cleaned up before the train came through. A big mistake most people make is not a large enough saw, the faster you get through the wood the safer it is.

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On 8/7/2018 at 6:29 AM, megacabcummins said:

I won't drop a tree next to a building, I'll let someone who's covered by insurance do it. Anything else I have no problem with. I dropped an old oak not far from Byron's house, that thing spun 270* on the stump and ended up on the RR tracks. Then we were scrambling to get it all cleaned up before the train came through. A big mistake most people make is not a large enough saw, the faster you get through the wood the safer it is.

Exactly. I had two alders that needed to come down.  I had a buddy come over with his saw tonfall them because it has way more power then mine.  Once on the ground then no problem.  If you cut an alder slow they like to split 

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I tend to cheat, use wedges, a long rope to a truck, take limbs off to bias the lean, things like that. Or apply a dose of excavator Yellow if one is handy ;)

Neighbor had a widowmaker that had fallen into another tree, and then had *another* tree lean on that mess. He mowed the lawn under that :crazy:

I brought the 120 home, unloaded it, snuck into his yard from the side, laid it all down, and reloaded it in about 15 minutes.

A few years before I was helping him prep for a new shop and he had a couple in his front yard he wanted down. Same 120, and I pushed this ~18" hemlock into the target just as  I planned. Before the dust settles, this really pissed off squirrel comes out of the wreckage, tells us both off and scrambles out of the yard!!

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Exactly. I had two alders that needed to come down.  I had a buddy come over with his saw tonfall them because it has way more power then mine.  Once on the ground then no problem.  If you cut an alder slow they like to split 
Barber chairs are nasty.

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