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2017 Diesels - could use some help

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I hate that manufacturers quit making paper brochures - I can't find something simple on their dumb websites that should be simple and easy.

 

I am trying to find the max trailer towing capacity for conventional/bumper pull trailers. Most of the ratings (if I'm understanding the information on the websites) appear to be based on 5th wheel (but I'm not sure). Calling my local dealerships has proved to be a waste of time - the sales people don't seem to know either. Perhaps some of you have already researched this and know the answer? Or have a good point of contact at a dealership that is well versed on their products.

 

I'm looking at the following:

2017 Chev/GMC Dmax 4x4 3500HD crew cab single rear wheel short box WT or LT model

2017 F350 Crew Cab 4x4 single rear wheel short box XL or XLT

2017 Ram 2500 4x4 Crew Cab single rear wheel short box Tradesman or SLT (considering due to the rear coil suspension and ride quality for daily driver use)

2017 Ram 3500 4x4 Crew Cab single rear wheel short box Tradesman or SLT

 

I think the Chevy is 13k lbs; and the Ram appears to be ~17k lbs. That seems like a huge difference to me, so I'm wondering if the Ram (based on the fine print) only shows 5th wheel capacities vs conventional/bumper pull?

 

Thanks in advance for any wisdom shared. I used to think of myself fairly technically inclined, but these new truck websites must be built to be intentionally vague... Back in the early 2000's they used to just publish a simple table that showed the truck configuration/engine/trans/ratio combo and its capabilities for conventional vs 5th wheel - easy and clear! Why not now... LOL

Edited by Lock

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Have you gone into a dealership? The owners manuals in the new trucks should have that or it would be a sticker somewhere.

 

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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also it does make a difference if auto or manual tranny, as well as gear ratio selected

Edited by GTroyer

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Three transmission choices.

Manual, lowest rated power

68rfe amd Aisin

Aisin rated for heaviest towing

 

I tow regularly with my 16, have pulled park models at 14k lbs non issue with the 68rfe

If you want 373 gears it will be a dually.

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Three transmission choices.

Manual, lowest rated power

68rfe amd Aisin

Aisin rated for heaviest towing

 

I tow regularly with my 16, have pulled park models at 14k lbs non issue with the 68rfe

If you want 373 gears it will be a dually.

 

According to this chart the SRW 68 truck is rated slightly higher than the Aisin (150lbs or so), but the DRW Aisin smokes the 68.

 

https://www.ramtrucks.com/assets/towing_guide/pdf/2017_ram_3500_towing_charts.pdf

 

In the fine print they also lead you to believe you only need a goose neck/5th wheel if your towing more than 18k, could that be right?

Edited by DRobinson

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DRobinson, that is exactly what I was hunting for. But, if I interpret it correctly, the Ram 3500 Crew Cab 4x4 SRW with a 68RE can only tow 17,200 lbs total regardless of conventional vs 5th wheel(?). The Class V receiver hitch is rated at 10% of 18000lbs, or 1800lb tongue weight, so I could pull a conventional trailer up to 17,200 lbs I suppose from this chart.

 

I'll have to see if I can find the same for the 2500 truck, as well as something similar for Ford and Chevy.

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DRobinson, that is exactly what I was hunting for. But, if I interpret it correctly, the Ram 3500 Crew Cab 4x4 SRW with a 68RE can only tow 17,200 lbs total regardless of conventional vs 5th wheel(?). The Class V receiver hitch is rated at 10% of 18000lbs, or 1800lb tongue weight, so I could pull a conventional trailer up to 17,200 lbs I suppose from this chart.

 

I'll have to see if I can find the same for the 2500 truck, as well as something similar for Ford and Chevy.

 

Here is the 2500 link, https://www.ramtrucks.com/assets/towing_guide/pdf/2017_ram_2500_towing_charts.pdf

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one other related, yet off topic, question:

 

My trailer has a max weight rating of 14k lbs. I don't haul anything that heavy, but I'm guessing I'm a solid 10k (going to find a local scale and see what it really is before the next race weekend).

 

If my 03 is only rated for 10k max conventional, and my trailer is heavier, say 11k lbs: would I get in trouble if I cause an accident. But... what if I have a truck (say the Chevy) that only has a max tow rating of 13k lbs conventional, and my trailer weighs 10k, but is rated to 14k. Do I get in trouble if involved in an accident? i.e.: should you have more legal capacity than the max rating on the trailer, or just how much you're actually towing?

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My experience is that authorities will look for the smallest number in the ratings.

For example, my long bed mega cab had a tow rating of 13,000 lbs but the GVW was only 10500. The truck weighed 8900lbs with me and fuel. Add pin weight and gear, and I was over a few times even though some numbers rated higher.

Another thing I've seen checked is tire ratings.

If you have a single rear wheel you might have 3200 lbs per tire, subtract the truck weight in those tires gives you what you can add.

 

I'd rather have more truck then equal or less.

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This is from the 2017 Ford Super Duty sales brochure

SRW Diesels as hugh as 15,000 conventional, 20,600 5th wheel and goose neck

DRW F350 Diesels 21,000 conventional 31,300 5th wheel and goose neck. F450 21,000 conventional and 32,500 5th and goose.

One thing that really impressed me the the Ford conventional hitch, much more robust than Dodge.

Don't know for sure about GM, but just watched a Video on a comparison on the three and ir said that GM MAX 5th and goose was 23,000.

Also seen in this video that Ford has a remote tailgate down feature (not sure if up is remote or not)

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interesting the Cumming was the best on miles and nearly best on Maximum load. 6.6 mpg at 22,500 towing.

  • Like 1

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Great link for the Fords, CSA!

 

I'm still wondering about the Ram tables - it clearly does not differentiate between bumper pull and 5th wheel like the other manufacturers tables.

 

For the Ford, looks like I'd have to be careful and insure I end up with a crew cab, short box, 4x4, diesel configuration that meets the 15k lb rating.

 

Ram, based on the tables, is basically 17k for the same config. And it appears looking at dealer sites that the Rams are far more affordable with more incentives and discounts currently. The only killer on the Ram, is no lumbar adjustment in a Tradesman model for my back - would have to have that added later via aftermarket.

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