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md_lucky_13

Transmission Service - NV5600

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This is a simple, step-by-step procedure on how to change the fluid in your NV5600 transmission. While Chrysler recommends that the fluid never be changed in this particular transmission, I'm of the opinion that any fluid will either wear out or become too full of debris over time.

 

One of the first steps is to determine the type of transmission fluid that you are going to use. I will not recommend one fluid over another (that is, of course, until a company PAYS me to recommend their fluids..) The most important thing to remember when picking your fluid is to use the APPROPRIATE fluid for the application. The warning on the transmission is VERY specific: Severe damage WILL result, and warranty will be Null and Void if improper fluid is used.

 

Here are the tools that you will need:

1: 5qts of preferred fluid (5/30 synchromesh)

2: 17mm Allen head

3: 14mm wrench/socket

4: Fluid transfer pump or funnel

5: Catch can that can hold 5qts used fluid

6: Paper Towels

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Edited by md_lucky_13

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Once you crawl under the truck, you need to find the check/fill plug on the side of the transmission. This is where you will use the 17mm allen head.

 

ALWAYS REMOVE THIS CHECK/FILL PLUG FIRST. If you decide to drain all of the fluid out of your transmission only to find that the plug is too tight or rounded, then you have almost no way to get fluid back into the transmission...

 

As you can tell by the pictures, I make a habit of checking the fluids regularly.. I also, apparently, make a habit of not tightening the check plug enough to prevent fluid seepage..

 

This is what the plug will look like under the transmission:

 

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As you remove the plug, you should have fluid come out. Be prepared to catch the fluid under the skid plate.

 

Here is another angle of where the check/fill is located, after the plug has already been removed.

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Next, you will remove the bottom bolt on the PTO cover. Most manual transmission have a drain plug built into them to allow service. However, since Chrysler does not recommend changing the transmission fluid, there is no drain plug built into the case of the transmission.

 

Here is the PTO cover:

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The lowest bolt will act just like a drain for the transmission. Be prepared to catch fluid once you remove it.

 

If you have never had these bolts out of the transmission before, there is a very good chance they will be extremely tight and difficult to remove. To further hamper this feat, you’re laying flat on your back under a truck with next to no leverage.

 

An easy way to break the bolt loose if you do not have a longer ratchet is to place the closed end of a box wrench over the handle of the ratchet. This should provide enough leverage to pop the bolt loose. Be careful not to bust any knuckles while breaking the bolt loose.

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After you remove the lowest bolt fluid will start pouring out. Have the catch can ready.

 

This will take some time to drain entirely. I would recommend stepping back from the job and relaxing a little while as the transmission drains. Go grab an ice cold beverage and watch some Sunday football.

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If you chose Amsoil fluid, it is now time to curse them for a few moments as you realize your handy-dandy fluid pump will not work on their bottles.

 

I found that by simply keeping the bottom of the straw in fluid I was able to pump fluid without too much difficulty. However, it would have made my life a lot easier if I could have attached the pump properly.

 

Place the end of the long straw into the check/fill plug. Even though this fluid is very expensive, its not a bad idea to run a small flush through the transmission. I hit the inside of the transmission with about 10 squirts of fluid, and then let all that brand new fluid flow back out the drain and into the pan.

 

 

This is where some discrepancy may occur. Many people may suggest removing the entire PTO cover. However, It's my personal belief that if you are not having any problems with the transmission it is not worth it to break the nice factory seal and pop the PTO cover off. This is preventative maintenance-don't create a new problem when you didn't have on in the first place.

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Edited by md_lucky_13

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After you have pumped a few squirts into the transmission, go ahead and replace the bottom PTO bolt. Once again, I let the few squirts drip out for a few moments before plugging the transmission back up.

 

Replace the PTO bolt, and start filling! While it sounds easy enough, this is often the most difficult part of the job. It can get a little bit interesting trying to keep the hose in the oil as you pump and make sure the other end stays in the transmission. I kept the catch can in place as I did end up spilling a little bit of fluid as I re-filled the transmission.

 

 

Keep filling the transmission until you see fluid start to come out of the check/fill.

 

If you want to over-fill the transmission (this is recommended by some members due to rear bearing problems) then there is an easier way to do it then simply trying to pump faster then fluid poors out the transmission.. Back the truck up on an hill (or use those handy dandy ramps) so most of the fluid will move forward. This makes it very easy to overfill the transmission.

 

If you are not going to overfill the transmission, give it a few extra squirts and then slap the check/fill plug back into place. You should have a small stream coming out of the check/fill as you put it back into place.

 

It took me almost exactly 4.5 quarts of fluid to fill the transmission.

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So much for life-time fluid!!

 

Even in the CAMERA you can see the small flakes of metal in the used transmission fluid.

 

 

While there are no recommendations on how long to run the fluid, I generally change all the gearbox fluids every year (I average about 30k miles per year, however). I would say a "safe" recommendation could be stretched to 50k miles, but consult your particular fluid manufacturer for their recommendations.

 

 

Its as simple as that! The total cost was somewhere around $50, so this is a simple and easy preventative maintenance item nearly anyone can tackle in their own back yard.

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If you chose Amsoil fluid, it is now time to curse them for a few moments as you realize your handy-dandy fluid pump will not work on their bottles.

 

 

 

But maybe amsoil was smart as they sell a pump that works with their bottles. Very nice instructions, that is exactly how I do it.

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Well thats a bummer!!

 

I'll see if I can find the old pictures... I think I lost them for a few others, too. :(

:p:

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Well thats a bummer!!

 

I'll see if I can find the old pictures... I think I lost them for a few others, too. :(

:p::P:

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And......

 

 

They're gone.

 

:(

 

I found some for the oil change thread, but I can't find any for this one. I guess the next time I do it, I'll take pictures again. :)

 

Well that's all bass ackwards!

 

The oil pics you SHOULD redo with the new and improved engine compartment. :rk:

 

Where'd you host the tranny pics?

 

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Where'd you host the tranny pics?

 

On here. I had just uploaded them. For some reason, I had the oil change pictures saved on this computer, but I think I saved the bypass oil filter and the transmission service pictures on the desk top... And they are now gone. :(

 

When I found the pictures on this computer, I just uploaded them to photobucket and edited all the posts. :)

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